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CRC funded reports

2017/18

Summaries of these reports are given below. These reports are held by the Australian Institute of Criminology's JV Barry Library and are available on inter-library loan. For full bibliographic information on any report, search the Library's Catalogue.

  1. CRG 31/11-12: Reporting Victimisation to LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex) Police Liaison Services: A mixed methods study across two Australian states
  2. CRG 43/13-14: Investigating serious violent crime: what works, what doesn't and for what crime types?
  3. CRG 09/14-15: Aboriginal prisoners with cognitive impairment – Is this the highest risk group?
  4. CRG 31/14-15: Surveillance technologies and crime control; understanding offenders’ perspectives on police body-worn video (BWV) cameras and CCTV

CRG 31/11-12: Reporting Victimisation to LGBTI (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Intersex) Police Liaison Services: A mixed methods study across two Australian states

Angela Dwyer, Matthew Ball, Christine Bond, Murray Lee, Thomas Crofts
Criminology Research Grant: CRG 31/11-12

Lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and intersex (LGBTI) police liaison programs were established around Australia from the late 1980s onwards to ameliorate the historically discriminatory relationships between LGBTI people and police. Police liaison officers are trained to know about LGBTI issues and are typically available for LGBTI people to seek support from in circumstances where they have been a victim, an offender, or even a witness to a crime. Interestingly, very few LGBTI people seek support from these officers when they need it (Berman and Robinson 2010), even though amongst LGBTI people there is a considerable awareness of these services being available.

CRG 43/13-14: Investigating serious violent crime: what works, what doesn't and for what crime types?

Angela Higginson, Elizabeth Eggins, Lorraine Mazerolle
Criminology Research Grant:  CRG 43/13-14

Serious violent crime is a persistent and significant criminal justice issue (see Eisner, 2003; Fuller, 2013; Truman, Langton, & Planty, 2013; Wallace et al., 2009). In 2003 and 2008, the Australian Institute of Criminology delivered a clear message: despite the relatively low number of incidents compared to non-violent crime, serious violent crime offences account for a substantial portion of the costs of crime in Australia (Mayhew, 2003; Rollings, 2008). Moreover, a number of scholars have demonstrated a decline in police clearance of serious violent crime over recent decades (Horvath et al., 2001; Litwin & Xu, 2007; Riedel, 2008). Although investigation and responding to serious violent crime are core components of police work, the evidence-base for police investigative techniques for serious violent crime lacks the level of evaluation and synthesis seen for other policing interventions which have been predominantly assessed according to their impact on general crime and disorder.

This systematic review aims to redress this imbalance by conducting the first ever systematic review focusing on the effectiveness of techniques that police use to investigate serious violent crime. Our review examines the evidence on police investigative techniques for serious violent crime to determine what works, what doesn’t, and for what crime types. Specifically, we systematically evaluate the impact of police investigative techniques on key police outcomes in the context of serious violent crime: offender identification, arrests, elicitation of confessions, convictions and case closure.

CRG 09/14-15: Aboriginal prisoners with cognitive impairment – Is this the highest risk group?

Stephane M. Shepherd, James R. P. Ogloff, Yin Paradies, Jeffrey Pfeifer
Criminology Research Grant: CRG 09/14-15

This study investigated the prevalence of cognitive impairment and its associations with mental health, cultural needs and offending for a representative cohort (N = 122) of adult Indigenous offenders in custody.

Results revealed an over-representation of cognitively impaired prisoners in the sample (22%). The prevalence of mental illness was exceptionally high, and so there was a large minority with concomitant illness/disability.

Given the widely publicised custodial overrepresentation and social disadvantages endured by Indigenous Australians, there was an expectation that Indigenous status and its associated risk factors would potentially preclude differentiation by level of cognitive impairment. This was true for several social and emotional wellbeing and custodial needs. However, possessing a cognitive disability was connected to poorer outcomes for participants in a number of areas.

Indigenous offenders with cognitive impairment were more susceptible to harmful coping mechanisms in the face of stressors such as drug and alcohol abuse. They were also more likely to perceive discrimination, have family members in custody and have trouble managing acute emotions compared to non cognitively impaired offenders.

The cognitively impaired subgroup were more likely to re-offend, were younger at first offence, and had greater numbers of prior offences.
Findings signal the need for culturally themed disability assistance and diversionary options at all levels of the criminal justice system.

CRG 31/14-15: Surveillance technologies and crime control; understanding offenders’ perspectives on police body-worn video (BWV) cameras and CCTV

Alexandra Gannoni, Matthew Willis, Emmeline Taylor, Murray Lee

Criminology Research Grant:  CRG 31/14-15

The use of surveillance technologies, in the form of closed-circuit television (CCTV) and police body-worn video cameras (BWCs), has become a feature of crime prevention and detection and plays an important role in police operations. While CCTV is in widespread use throughout Australia, evidence on the effectiveness of the technology for deterrence and detection and possible displacement remains mixed. There is also little evidence on the effectiveness of BWCs and their impact on interactions between police and members of the public. For both CCTV and BWCs there is a lack of evidence about how people who are acted against by the police perceive surveillance technology and whether it influences their crime-related decisions and behaviour at the time of arrest.

This study aimed to increase understanding of the perceptions and impacts of CCTV and BWCs through interviews with 899 adult police detainees, using an addendum to the Drug Use Monitoring in Australia (DUMA) program. Detainees were interviewed during the second half of 2015 at police watchhouses in four Australian state capital cities - Adelaide, Brisbane, Perth and Sydney.

Police detainees tended to regard CCTV as effective in reducing crime, particularly violent crime, but a significant number felt it would not prevent any crime. CCTV deterred some from committing crime, but had no deterrent effect for a substantial proportion. Detainees identified a range of simple strategies for avoiding surveillance cameras, such as covering their face or turning away from cameras. Findings suggest that police detainees are largely supportive of the use of police BWCs, but this was predicated on a number of operational and procedural requirements. The responses of detainees highlighted the need for evidence-based policy on the deployment of BWCs, in particular the need for clear guidelines and protocols about how and when they are operated.

 

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